Free shipping on all orders over £20! Free shipping on all orders over £20! 😍
Home / Living with Lactose

Living with Lactose

Living with Lactose | Issue XIII

Living with Lactose | Issue XIII

July 2021 | Issue XIII

Living with Lactose 101

The Digestion Diaries

Good evening Dairy Dreamers 🙇🏽‍♂️

Welcome back to the thirteenth instalment of Living with Lactose!

Here’s to another week full of advice, tips, and hints on aiding your digestion and helping our tastebuds explore - letting us all seize the day 🐮

In our thirteenth weekly digestion diary, we’ve got a special cheesy edition!

➕ How unlimited cheese choice is one thing we never want to be restricted with, and why lactose-free doesn’t give us the taste we’re looking for 😋

➕ Why pill-makers and pharmaceutical companies use lactose in their products 💊

➕ Our Event of the Year: Love Cheese Live 🍷 & our Indulgence of the Week: Cheese 🧀

There's a million ways to enjoy one of the world’s most basic, yet important pleasures, pain-free. We're here to guide you and keep you informed every step of the way 🕺🏽

Quote of the Week: Charles de Gaulle

Former Officer, Statesman & President of France

 
“How can you govern a country which has 246 varieties of cheese?”
 
Taste the Difference: Why Lactose-Free Just Doesn’t Cut It 🍕

 

So, laborious lactose, it’s the sugar in milk, and, by extension, cheese.

As many of our readers will know by now, lactose is the enemy, the reason why so many of us have a complicated relationship with dairy. It’s exactly what our bodies find increasingly difficult to digest as we get older. With each year that goes by, we naturally lose the levels of lactase enzyme that had us able to benefit from our mothers’ milk, leading to annoying cramps, gas, bloating, and a host of avoidable pains, when we’re just trying to live our lives.

As lactose is found in the milk of all mammals, our loss of natural intestinal lactase couldn’t come at a worse time. As we grow up, we experience the decadence of dairy and its creamy presence everywhere we look, in all of our favourite meals, desserts, and drinks. 

The pragmatic readers amongst you may happily conclude that none of these issues matter when there’s lactose-free milk, cream cheese, cream, and cheddar available in stores!

Well, sadly, the problem here lies with exactly what lactose is, as the sugar in milk, it adds an unmistakeable taste to anything its in. Interestingly, it’s only about 1/7th as sweet as sucrose, ordinary table sugar.

Oddly, this is exactly why so many industry suppliers use it! It allows for a bit of pleasant sweetness to be added to products, without overwhelming them with an overtly sweet taste. For example, bakers can sprinkle bits of lactose on the top of bread and let it caramelize to a tasty golden-brown.

This means lactose is used far and wide, helping explain why pill-makers and pharmaceutical companies make use of it, the extremely tiny amount of active ingredient in a tablet needs to be surrounded with fillers that bulk it out and make it large enough to handle.

Lactose makes this easier as it fills the tablet and leaves it with just enough sweetness to balance out any bitter taste!

Unfortunately, this makes lactose as much of a blessing as it is a curse. We may decide we want to use lactose-free products, but they’ll never be able to replace the taste of the real thing.

Additionally, lactose is being increasingly used as a flavouring agent wherever we look! From ready meals to cheesy snacks and sweeteners like Canderel, lactose adds taste and texture, helping to justify exactly why we like the foods we do.

Importantly, this is why we created a product that digests the lactose in dairy for you, so that your stomach doesn’t have to.

Lactose-free items just add lactase to regular milk or cheese to remove the lactose.

Not only does this limit our grocery shops, as items like cheese are restricted to basic cheddar, it’s entirely unnecessary when you can have all the lactase your body needs an arms-reach away. Whether on holiday, or at home, our tiny tablets ensure you never need to worry about the dairy you may find yourself enjoying, ever again.

 

Event of the Year: Love Cheese Live! 🍷

 

Our eagle-eyed readers will notice something is amiss! There’s no Restaurant of the Week!

Well, we’ve decided to avert attention to an even more decadent and delightful event, the largest cheese show in the world, live in Staffordshire between October 22nd to 23rd, Love Cheese Live!  

In late October, we plan to be amongst 350 different exhibitors at the UK’s largest cheese, food, and wine weekender – giving attendees a wealth of outstanding tasting, shopping, and drinking to choose from, whilst we test the latest trends, and the finest products, the world’s best independent suppliers have to offer.

Additionally, some of the most exciting, enlightening experts will be there to recommend and advise on all things dairy. Giving precious cooking gold dust from Michelin starred and celebrity chefs, alongside hints and tips from experts like ourselves.

 

 

Indulgence of the Week: Cheese 🧀

 

Oh, wonderful cheese! Our love for this often-smelly substance is helpfully illustrated by the vast array of options we have when trying to pick our perfect slice. We value cheese for its portability, long shelf life, and high content of fat, protein, calcium, and phosphorus.

Over a thousand types of cheese exist and are produced worldwide. Texture, flavour, and style are all dependent on factors such as the animal the milk came from, how long it’s been aged, whether it’s been pasteurised, butterfat content, and the presence of bacteria. 

Our Instagram followers may have seen that in 2020, Benoît Bruel broke the Guinness World Record by adding 254 different varieties of cheese on a pizza! At roughly $4 per pack, he spent about $1,000 putting the pizza together 🤑

At this year’s International Cheese and Dairy Awards, hosted by Love Cheese Live, one supreme champion will be found. To categorise this as an easy decision would be drastically undercutting it, with over 5,000 cheeses on display as entries from all four corners of the world, it’s easier to find a needle in a haystack then crown a champion.

 

    

Until Next Time!

Dairy is such an unavoidable and enjoyable fact of life, we started a business just so we could focus on it 😎 supplying high quality lactase tablets that ensure you’re prepared for any indulgence, and any occasion, that life might throw at you! 🥳✨

See you next week Dairy Dreamers 🤩

 

Sources Used:

Johnson, M.E. (2017). "A 100-Year Review: Cheese production and quality". Journal of Dairy Science. 100 (12): 9952–9965

White S., White G. (1991) Dairy flavourings. In: Ashurst P.R. (eds) Food Flavorings. Springer, Boston, MA.

Christian Storhaug and others, 'Country, regional, and global estimates for lactose malabsorption in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis' [2017] 2(10) The Lancet - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

lovecheeselive.co.uk

Living with Lactose | Issue XII

Living with Lactose | Issue XII

July 2021 | Issue XII

Living with Lactose 101

The Digestion Diaries

 Good evening Dairy Dreamers 🙇🏽‍♂️

Welcome back to the twelfth instalment of our weekly series, Living with Lactose!

Here’s to another week full of advice, tips and hints on aiding your digestion and helping our tastebuds explore - letting us all seize the day 🐮

In our twelfth weekly digestion diary, we’ll be diving into tapas and exploring:

➕ The debate around school lunches and how we can deal with children losing their ability to digest dairy easily 🥛

➕ How studies show this needs to be balanced out with the nutritional benefits (and tastiness) that dairy brings 😋

➕ Our Restaurant of the Week: Bar Estilo 🥘 & our Indulgence of the Week: Tapas 🍖

There's a million ways to enjoy one of the world’s most basic, yet important pleasures, pain-free. We're here to guide you and keep you informed every step of the way 🕺🏽

Quote of the Week: Joan Dye Gussow

“The matriarch of the eat-locally-think-globally food movement”

 

“As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists.”

 

School Lunches: Why Stress? 🤔

 

First introduced after World War II, free milk in schools has been credited with tackling malnutrition in the UK for over 70 years. 

If we think back to our school days, we might remember the comforting, tasty and nutritious handouts of milk on a near daily basis – a staple drink that could give our young bodies everything we needed to learn, play, and develop.

Whilst this is certainly true for so many children, recently, there’s been a much brighter light shone on our inability to digest dairy properly as we get older. 

Studies have shown that, whilst healthy infants usually exhibit high levels of lactase activity (the enzyme that breaks down lactose, the sugar in dairy), the post weaning period sees the emergence of 2 types: lactase deficiency and lactase persistence.

For the millions of us that become lactase deficient, our lactase production begins to gradually decrease some time during childhood. For this group, studies of children have indicated we approach adult levels of lactose intolerance around the ages of 7-10 years.

As such, from around the age of 7-10, our body’s natural ability to absorb dairy easily starts to go downhill…

This is where the debate surrounding giving milk to children at school begins. Whilst the original aim of the “free milk” scheme was to boost basic nutrition for children most in need, some professionals have argued that the programme overlooks minority ethnic communities and has the potential to peg children back in their day.

It is true that those from Black and Asiatic communities suffer from much larger instances of lactase deficiency, with up to 100% of some communities failing to digest dairy properly. However, as always, these struggles need to be balanced with the unique benefits that dairy brings.  

Indeed, many of our customers buy our tablets for their children so that they can enjoy and absorb everything at dinner properly, alongside being able to enjoy the tastier things, such as ice cream, whilst they’re out and about with friends or family, enjoying the day.

 

Nutritional Brilliance: Why Milk Should Stay 🥛

 Arguably one of the more important aspects of our relationship with milk is its taste and ease. Children (and many adults) are picky! There aren’t many things that deliver great nutrition, as easily, and as tastily, as milk.

Currently, there is no plant-based beverage that is nutritionally identical to milk and can replace the nutrition offered by milk without significant processing and fortification.

Dairy remains the world’s best option for calcium, a great choice of protein, and an easy way to access essential vitamins A, D and B12 (essential for healthy immune function). This makes it a huge contributor to calcium, iodine, and riboflavin intakes for children, all essential for healthy bodily function and to keep our spirits high.

Additionally, a recent study has linked declining milk consumption in US schools with negative health outcomes in later life. The study showed that regular milk consumption in childhood reduced risk of osteoporosis, hypertension, obesity, and cancer in adulthood.

These countless benefits and applications of dairy in our everyday life show why we’re so focused on absorbing milk properly. Illustrating why we felt it was so important to solve this problem, versus just avoiding it.

Taste, application, and nutrition are three of the reason’s dairy has been around for the hundreds of years it has. As a company, we want to make sure this enjoyment and nutritional masterclass doesn’t need to end anytime soon.

 

Restaurant of the Week: Bar Estilo 🥘

 

Bringing Hispanic culture and their relaxed approach to drinking and eating to London and Birmingham, Bar Estilo is a classic Spanish restaurant that has been making tasty tapas and paella for the last 21 years.

At a traditional tapas bar, 2-4 customers usually order around 10-12 plates, tasting a little bit of everything, from small bites like Manchego cheese to traditional tapas like patatas bravas. Giving a huge variety of Mediterranean flavours, from veggie options to meat and fish.

    

 

Indulgence of the Week: Tapas 🍖

 

We may have cheated a little bit by making tapas our indulgence of the week, as it actually applies to many hundreds of small dishes, eaten as an appetizer, snack or main meal, hot or cold. But as we’re here, we might as well dive into the Spanish history.

The word “tapas” is derived from the Spanish verb tapar, “to cover”. In pre-19th century Spain, tapas were served in inns, hostels, and wine bars. Since few innkeepers could write and few travellers could read, inns offered their guests a sample of the dishes available, on a “tapa”, the word for pot cover in Spanish.

As Spaniards usually have dinner between 9-11pm, tapas usually work as an easy snack between finishing work and having dinner. Making tapas a perfect pairing with drinks in the evening, or, before a late lunch on weekends.

   

 

Until Next Time!

Dairy is such an unavoidable and enjoyable fact of life we started a business just so we could focus on it 😎 supplying high quality lactase tablets that ensure you’re prepared for any indulgence, and any occasion, that life might throw at you! 🥳✨

See you next week Dairy Dreamers 🤩

 

Studies Used:

L Sipple and D Barbano, 'Maintaining and growing fluid milk consumption by children in school lunch programs in the United States' [2020] 103(9) Journal of Dairy Science

Richard A Forsgard, 'Lactose digestion in humans: intestinal lactase appears to be constitutive whereas the colonic microbiome is adaptable' [2019] 110(2) The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

 

Christian Storhaug and others, 'Country, regional, and global estimates for lactose malabsorption in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis' [2017] 2(10) The Lancet - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Living with Lactose | Issue XI

Living with Lactose | Issue XI

July 2021 | Issue XI

Living with Lactose 101

The Digestion Diaries

Good evening Dairy Dreamers 🙇🏽‍♂️

Welcome back to the eleventh instalment of our weekly series, Living with Lactose!

Here’s to another week full of advice, tips and hints on aiding your digestion and helping our tastebuds explore - letting us all seize the day 🐮

In our eleventh weekly digestion diary, we’ll be breaking the bloat and identifying some serious struggle-foods:

➕ Helping us avoid the guilt that gas brings and how a deeper digestive understanding can help us minimise the bloating that usually comes with it 💨

➕ How we can be fearless with our food and drink when we know what enemies to look out for 👀

➕ Our Restaurant of the Week: Nandos 🐔 & our Indulgence of the Week: The Pastel De Nata 🧁

There's a million ways to enjoy one of the world’s most basic, yet important pleasures, pain-free, and we're here to guide you and keep you informed every step of the way 🕺🏽

 

Quote of the Week: Irena Chalmers

“The culinary oracle of 100 cookbooks”

 

“There are three reasons for breast-feeding: the milk is always at the right temperature; it comes in attractive containers; and the cat can’t get it.”

Gruesome Gas: What Do I Blame? 🤔

 

Whilst we all feel different ways and experience unique things, there’s one fact of life that rings true for everyone, whether it’s a beautiful burp, or fearful flatulence, everybody gets gas.

How painful gas can be depends on a number of factors, the culprit can be as simple as swallowed air, but any pain is more likely the result of the unique properties of your body, specifically, how able our intestines are at dealing with foreign foods like lactose and complex carbohydrates.

Indeed, intestinal gas can be an awful pain. As the abdomen becomes swollen due to gas, it often leads to uncomfortable and uneasy bloating in the stomach, this bloating is likely all too familiar, with clothes becoming tight and, at times, not fitting at all!

Therefore, it’s encouraging to know we can do something about it.

Dairy Digestion

As the most common intolerance in the world, dairy often leads to gas due to our inability to break down and digest all the lactose we may be consuming in a snack, meal, or drink.

By the time we’re adults, most of our bodies no longer naturally produce enough lactase, the enzyme that breaks down lactose. This means that with a lot of the foods we eat and enjoy, lactose goes undigested, allowing it to ferment once it gets to our large intestine.

Once at the large intestine, the indigestible sugar (lactose) becomes fermented by bacteria, producing gas, bloating, diarrhoea and other stomach pains.

The Solution

I’m sure you all can have a great guess as to what can stop this pain 😉 supplementing our body with the lactase enzyme it’s missing helps prevent gas by breaking down the indigestible lactose into absorbable sugars.

As the science for food enzymes is so well established, we’ve been able to create a tiny, highly effective lactase enzyme that loves to digest dairy, giving your stomach a much-needed rest.

Complex Carbohydrates

Sometimes, we lack the enzyme necessary to digest complex carbohydrates like vegetables, legumes, and grains. This can be a common issue with those suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and is known as Complex Carbohydrates Intolerance (CCI). Other conditions, such as celiac disease, pancreatitis, and short-bowel syndrome, can also make it difficult to digest complex carbohydrates.

When the undigested carbohydrates reach the large intestine, the bacteria that normally live there ferments them. This fermentation, similar to dairy digestion, results in the production of gas.

One way to imagine this is by thinking about how champagne is made 🍾 fermented grapes begin to bubble, leading to a build-up of gas and pressure accumulating inside – the same sort of pressure that hurts us!

The Solution

An enzyme called alpha-galactosidase has been shown to be effective at helping reduce gas in the digestive tract due to these complex carbs. If you remember our FODMAP newsletter, these carbs are polysaccharides and oligosaccharides, found in beans, peanuts, broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage amongst other things!

The enzyme, similar to lactase, breaks down these indigestible carbs into absorbable sugars, as these complex carbs are happily digested, the onset of symptoms caused by fermentation in the long intestine can’t take place.

Swallowing Air

It sounds like a joke, but swallowing air is a simple way to increase your burps and farts…

Usually, we expel the air we swallow naturally, in small amounts, throughout the day 😅 Yet there are still a lot of us that swallow excessive amounts of air, causing a build up in our intestines and, you guessed it, more gas!

We seem to take in more air when we are under stress or when we swallow frequently. For example, from drinking through a straw or from smoking 🚬

Our intestines can also move food through slower than normal, making swallowed air more of a problem as the air builds up and moves backward into the stomach, causing burping and bloating amongst other things.

The Solution

Simethicone, an anti-foaming agent, can be used to reduce bloating and discomfort caused by excessive gas.

At Leaving Lactose, we’re exploring this agent as studies have shown that it can relieve symptoms of indigestion and bloating! It does this by breaking down gas bubbles in the stomach and intestine so they can be expelled by the body naturally.

Enjoyable Enemies: Am I Missing Something? 😬

 

As we know, a room full of people with lactose intolerance will experience a sliding-scale of symptoms. Just because most of us struggle with lactose, doesn’t mean we all suffer the same. Our sensitivities will always be different as our bodies are not all the same, but with that being said, here are a few under-the-radar culprits worth looking out for:

Whey Protein

Despite its position as the most popular supplement on the planet, with an illustrious list of well documented health benefits, your protein shake could be the reason behind a lot of the painful toilet trips you may have had in the past.

The problem whey protein gives to our digestion lies with how it’s made. Whey is the liquid that separates from milk during the cheese-making process 🧀 the whey is then filtered, refined, and dried into whey protein powder.

The obvious issue with being a by-product of cheese is the presence of the ever-so-tasty, yet ever-so-painful sugar in milk… lactose.

Sweeteners & Medication

As a milk-based sugar, lactose is frequently used as a flavouring agent, this makes it perfect for sweeteners, especially those that are used as an alternative to sugar, such as Canderel.

This also shows why it’s commonly used as a filler or base for birth control pills and other medications, it improves the drug’s bioavailability and the taste of a quick dissolve tablet.

So, next time you have to take any medication, make sure to give the ingredients a read, dependent on your sensitivity, the lactose inside may mean the sweetener or medication gives you an uncomfortable reminder of your dairy intolerance.

Baileys and Cream Liqueurs

We’ve been told by customers that Baileys is a silent killer 😄 despite the heavenly taste, the full name should tell you what you need to know.

Baileys is an Irish cream, a cream liqueur based on Irish whiskey, cream, and other flavourings. The reason behind its beautiful taste is also why it can hurt us so badly, with the cream still containing lactose. Its sweet taste is also used to flavour desserts and other sweet treats!

Restaurant of the Week: Nandos 🐔

 In 1987, Nando’s started their long journey from Johannesburg, South Africa.

The fast-food chain, specialising in peri-peri style chicken, quickly exploded, with 1,200 restaurants in 35 countries. Interestingly, peri peri sauce was first developed in Mozambique, before being further refined in South Africa and then eventually taken to Portugal!

You could say the UK is Nando’s home away from home, with 400 restaurants and the largest collection of South African art in the UK, with over 5,000 works displayed in restaurants!

  

 

Indulgence of the Week: The Pastel De Nata 🧁

 This dreamy, delicious, and daring egg custard pastry dusted with cinnamon was created in the 18th century by Catholic monks in Lisbon, Portugal.

At the time, monks used a lot of egg-whites to starch their clothes, this meant there were usually a lot of leftover egg yolks to make cakes and pastries, resulting in the beauty that we have today.

One of the most famous pastel restaurants, Fábrica de Pastéis de Belém, keep the original recipe of the pastel de nata in a secret room. The recipe remains unchanged to this day, with the shop selling over 20,000 pastels a day!

   

 

See You Next Week!

Dairy is such an unavoidable and enjoyable fact of life we started a business just so we could focus on it 😎 supplying high quality lactase tablets that ensure you’re prepared for any indulgence, and any occasion, that life might throw at you! 🥳✨

We hope we’ve managed to give some dairy enlightenment with the world finally opening up! 

See you next week Dairy Dreamers 🤩